All My Children star Debbi Morgan breaks down over black communities devastated by the coronavirus

‘So many of us are dying’: All My Children’s Debbi Morgan sobs as she talks about black communities ravaged by coronavirus

Debbi Morgan has begged her fellow black Americans to only make essential outings, amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The 63-year-old All My Children actress posted a clip to Instagram on Friday just before she went out for some grocery shopping.

Urging people to only go out for essentials, she broke down in tears at the way COVID-19 has ravaged the black community. 

Hardest hit: Debbi Morgan, 63, was overcome with emotion on Friday in an Instagram video about the coronavirus’ devastation on the black community

Debbi filmed her short video in close-up from the front seat of her car. 

‘This is my first day out in about 12 days. I’m on my way to whole foods to get some important essentials that we need!’ she began, raising her voice at the end to shame those who have ignored social distancing guidelines.

‘And I don’t know, for some reason today I’ve just been overcome with such emotion. I just want all of us to get through this and to the other side.

Do the right thing: 'This is my first day out in about 12 days. I’m on my way to whole foods to get some important essentials that we need!' she said, calling out those who didn't social distance

Do the right thing: ‘This is my first day out in about 12 days. I’m on my way to whole foods to get some important essentials that we need!’ she said, calling out those who didn’t social distance

Overcome: 'I just want all of us to get through this and to the other side. And especially within our black communities, where people are sick and dying,' she continued, as her eyes welled up

Overcome: ‘I just want all of us to get through this and to the other side. And especially within our black communities, where people are sick and dying,’ she continued, as her eyes welled up

‘And especially within our black communities, where people are sick and dying,’ she continued, as her eyes began to well up with tears.

‘So many of us are dying, and we can’t put food on the table for our children. We can’t pay our rent, we can’t pay our mortgages,’ she said.

‘Our ancestors were a strong people and they got through slavery. We are still a strong people and we will get through this COVID-19, but we have got to be smart, and stay safe, because we cannot, and will not, be broken.’ 

One thing after another: 'So many of us are dying, and we can’t put food on the table for our children. We can’t pay our rent, we can’t pay our mortgages'

One thing after another: ‘So many of us are dying, and we can’t put food on the table for our children. We can’t pay our rent, we can’t pay our mortgages’

The numbers: Data from states show that black people are disproportionately getting sick and dying from COVID-19, which may be attributable to racially disparate policies

The numbers: Data from states show that black people are disproportionately getting sick and dying from COVID-19, which may be attributable to racially disparate policies

TV doctor: Debbi is best known for her long runs on All My Children as Dr. Angela Baxter Hubbard from 1982–1990, and later from 2008–2011 and 2013

TV doctor: Debbi is best known for her long runs on All My Children as Dr. Angela Baxter Hubbard from 1982–1990, and later from 2008–2011 and 2013

Last month, several states throughout the US released data revealing that black American were becoming infected and dying of COVID-19 at disproportionately high rates compared to their percentage of the population. 

African Americans are more likely to have jobs with little sick pay, and they’re more likely to be in industries deemed essential.

Debbi is best known for her long runs on All My Children as Dr. Angela Baxter Hubbard from 1982–1990, and later from 2008–2011. 

She became the first African American to win the Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series for the role.

Morgan has also had a length film career, including appearances in The Hurricane and Love & Basketball.

She played a major supporting role in the critically acclaimed drama Eve’s Bayou from 1997, which was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry in 2018. 

Honored: She became the first African American to win the Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series for the role; still from All My Children

Honored: She became the first African American to win the Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series for the role; still from All My Children

Source link

Leave a Comment